Our clinic in Guatemala is 3 years old!

We’ve experienced many different challenges: shortages of medicine, volunteers eating expired food, only cold showers.

On the 24th of February, 2017, our team of volunteers sighed with relief and cut the ceremonial ribbon, opening the doors of our clinic in Guatemala. We’ve walked a long, hard road from the moment we had the idea for a clinic and started looking for financial support to the moment we started building and working alongside local people. Today we remember all this with a smile as we see hundreds of happy people coming to our clinic. It wasn’t easy for our volunteers, who sometimes had to eat expired food, shower with cold water and sleep on matresses on the floor.

But we are thrilled seeing all we have achieved in the last three years. And we couldn’t have done it without our volunteers or your donations. On our clinic’s birthdays, volunteers, doctors, nurses, administrators and photographers invite children from our town and nearby villages to celebrate with us. We organize sporting events and creative competitions for them. And there are sweets of course. But the highlight of the party is the PIÑATA! It is a Latin-American tradition when adults fill a paper-doll with sweets and candies, and then children of all ages, starting from the little ones, try to break the doll!

But don’t worry! No children have been hurt for the past three years!

 

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